Monday, 12 May 2008

Noticing the details

At my yoga class last week, we were talking about being in the present. So much of the time we are caught up in thinking about what has happened in the past or worrying about what might take place in the future.

One way to remain in the present is to pay attention to our surroundings, to look closely and notice all the details, the sights, sounds and scents that we all too often take for granted.


This last weekend, while out for a walk, I tried to pay attention to the world around me rather than being wrapped up in my own thoughts. As always, this was much easier said than done, but I found taking photographs was a good way to focus my mind on what my yoga teacher would call " the here and now".




A few photographs of the details - flowers as usual, I've always loved wild flowers.












Finally after all the little details, the bigger picture, a slightly hazy view from the top of the hill.


10 comments:

Jessica at Bwlchyrhyd said...

Are those rape fields I see in the distance?

willow said...

Yes, Jessica, they are rape fields. They seem to be everywhere at the moment, they look attractive its just the smell I hate, especially when the flowers fade. I know you have used rape seed oil, I've yet to try it but perhaps I should in an effort to reduce food miles since we have many more rape fields than olive groves round here!

Heather L. said...

I love the flower pictures and that last picture of the overall view makes me homesick for Scotland where we saw things very similar. I'm thinking that the canola oil I often use is from rapeseed (I think). I've never seen rapeseed growing here in the States though.

the flour loft said...

i like this post... i sat and watched a tiny blue dragonfly in the garden today. Lovely photos especially the daisy. On Sunday i saw a green absolutely covered in daisies... i could have sat and made daisy chains for hours. It seems to be a good year for daisies.
ginny x

Ernestine said...

A very meaningful post.
Part if my journey at this time.
Easier said then done.
Blessings to you this day.

Jessica at Bwlchyrhyd said...

What do the rape fields smell like then? There are some on the opposite hill to me, but they are fairly small, and some distance away, and I can't smell anything.

The oil itself is lovely and a bit nutty. It has a much higher smoke point that olive oil as well, so you can use it for anything from frying to salad dressing. Let me know if you have difficulty finding some.

Heather -- re Canola oil: The Canola oil that you buy in supermarkets in America is not the same thing as the rapeseed oil that I use. The Canola oil in supermarkets has been hot pressed, which involves heating it up, adding a solvent to boost the extraction rate and then refining and deodorising it. I use cold pressed rapeseed oil which preserves the nutrients in the rapeseed rather than destroying them. The most common solvent used in hot pressing is petroleum-derived hexane. Not what I want to be eating. I'm not sure if you can get cold pressed rapeseed oil in America, but you should be eating stuff that grows near you -- not sure where in America you are, but perhaps olive oil would be a better choice for you.

willow said...

Hi Jessica, Its always difficult to describe an unpleasant smell isn't it, the best thing I can come up with is stale cabbage smell. Perhaps its just a smell I don't like or maybe its one of those smells that only some people can detect.

libby said...

I am new to your blog (waiting to read about a day in your life) but had to say how much I loved your photos.I shouldn't have been suprised to see you live in England - such a beautiful country - lucky you!!!

Libby (in Australia)

Still at Home said...

Hi, I came here via your day in my life post. Lovely pictures. Do you know the names of those wild flowers?

willow said...

Hi
A quick run through of the flower names,

from top to bottom

cowslips
daisy
milkwort
dandelion clock
speedwell
plantain

I enjoy taking pictures and am thinking of getting all the photos together to provide a record of the flowers growing around here - I did something similar with pressed flowers when I was a girl but unfortunately no longer have my collection.